Strategies for Systematic implementation of the Building inspection report

building inspection

Based on the analysis of the rules on Building & Pest Inspection and the experience gained with the preparation of reports, a reflection is made on the main barriers that prevent the systematization of the Building Inspection and a series of strategies are proposed that could help to overcome them, from different areas, contemplating measures of financing, management, information to the citizen, etc.

Communication and training

The main Building inspection strategy would be to get the owners aware of the specific intervention needs of their building. The knowledge of the real possibilities of improvements and of the benefits that their execution would bring, could motivate the owners to undertake rehabilitation works.

The user must be aware of the levels of improvement that could be achieved, especially in aspects related to improving the quality of life and the family economy, such as thermal comfort and energy savings, obviously without forgetting the objective fundamental of a Building Inspection report that is to raise awareness to address the maintenance of the building that, ultimately, increases safety by reducing the risk.

This knowledge of the building can be generated through the new conception of the Building & Pest Inspection, which has led to an integrating Building Inspection, covering not only aspects related to the state of conservation of a building, but also those about energy efficiency and accessibility of the buildings.

Buildings, delving into this process of rationalization and integration of various figures and documents, to facilitate information to the owners jointly. The comprehensive information can facilitate the necessary agreement so that a community of owners, formed by members with different concerns, needs and economic possibilities, decides to invest in the rehabilitation of their property.

It is important to launch awareness campaigns on the Building Inspection report through public administrations, which inform about their obligation and the preventive role they have in the conservation of the building. It is necessary to direct efforts to create a culture of maintenance. In this area, the role of the Farm Managers is fundamental, since they are the main vehicle of communication with the communities of owners.

It is understood that the training of professionals, technicians and builders is essential in matters of inspection and evaluation of buildings. They should be aware of the real possibilities of energy improvement of a building to advice and duly justify users about the advantages of this type of intervention.

In line with this reflection, it would also be interesting to prepare documents and support guides for technicians, given that the current regulations are fundamentally oriented to the new work and important gaps in the field of rehabilitation are detected, not only in purely technical, but also in those related to management.

building inspection

Procedural and operational building inspection

The integrative approach of the Building Inspection, could induce rehabilitation actions of different disciplines among themselves. It is known how costly and time-consuming it is for a community to make the decision to rehabilitate a property, but once the corresponding actions have been initiated, it will always be easier to promote other types of rehabilitation.

In this sense, as can be seen from the analysis of the Building & Pest Inspection carried out, on the one hand, the existing residential park is characterized by high energy inefficiency and, on the other hand, the buildings built between the years 60 and 80, are the most demanded of rehabilitation, especially for deficiencies in facades.

It seems logical that, on the one hand, if the facades present a greater number of damages and, on the other hand, it has been demonstrated that intervening energy in them is the option that provides the greatest energy savings, the first intervention could lead to the second. In addition, material and auxiliary means would be used that would make interventions cheaper, because planning them separately would always be more expensive.

If the owners have a report that indicates the deficiencies in energy performance of the possible savings that could be achieved, it will be easy to encourage them to improve the thermal envelope of the building. It has been shown that intervening energy in them is the option that provides greater energy savings, the first intervention could lead to the second.

In addition, material and auxiliary means would be used that would make interventions cheaper, because planning them separately would always be more expensive. If the owners have a report that indicates the deficiencies in energy performance of the possible savings that could be achieved, it will be easy to encourage them to improve the thermal envelope of the building.

It has been shown that intervening energy in them is the option that provides greater energy savings, the first intervention could lead to the second. In addition, material and auxiliary means would be used that would make interventions cheaper, because planning them separately would always be more expensive.

If the owners have a report that indicates the deficiencies in energy performance of  the possible savings that could be achieved, it will be easy to encourage them to improve the thermal envelope of the building. So planning them separately would always be more expensive.

If the owners have a report that indicates the deficiencies in energy performance of the possible savings that could be achieved, it will be easy to encourage them to improve the thermal envelope of the building. So planning them separately would always be more expensive.

If the owners have a report that indicates the deficiencies in energy performance of the possible savings that could be achieved, it will be easy to encourage them to improve the thermal envelope of the building.

It is necessary to take advantage of the capacity of investment drag that can have other types of improvements in a building. In short, it would try to take advantage of the theory of “since …”, which has proved to be effective and which consists of linking the rehabilitations that citizens do consider interesting or necessary, such as an intervention to eliminate architectural barriers, repair dampness, etc. to others that are not so requested because of disinformation fundamentally of citizens, such as energy rehabilitation.

It is considered essential to propose a computer tool for the Building Inspection report that allows having homogeneous and verifiable results, that is accessible, approved and that is accredited as a Recognized Document.

Nowadays, with the existing computer resources, the Building Inspection procedure should work through an online application , with three different profiles or levels of use: technical inspector, administration of files for a town hall and management of a database of residential buildings autonomous and state level.

This information should be able to be managed through a Geographic Information System, given the potential for analysis and diagnosis that these work platforms have today and that would allow the elaboration of maps of deteriorated urban areas and manage the construction census, buildings, housing and premises required rehabilitation, to help guide the implementation of rehabilitation policies.

The computerization through GIS would allow the citizen, and the rest of the agents involved, to access the basic information about the Building Inspection elaborated, in a similar way as it is done with the energy certificates.

This would allow a prospective buyer or tenant to have access to information on the state of preservation of the buildings, a fact that would help to have a more transparent real estate market with greater guarantees.

In municipalities with macro seismic intensities equal to or greater than VII, it would be interesting to propose that the Building Inspection collect basic information, but sufficient to be able to estimate the seismic vulnerability of the inspected building and point out some improvement criteria in response to a seismic movement. This information is valuable when preparing the Municipal Action Plans against seismic risk.

building inspection

Management and coordination

In any case, it has been shown that information is not enough, nor is the obligation of maintenance, already present in our legal system, but it is necessary that state and regional administrations lead the process, providing the necessary tools so that this information is transformed into an investment decision, but this objective can only be achieved with the agreement and promotion from local administrations.

It is essential to develop coordination mechanisms between different administrations that influence the Building Inspection report, at its different levels: central, autonomous, and municipal. For this reason and in order that the information generated is easily transferable, it must be promoted that data collection occurs through the Integrated Single Registry, with public information.

To streamline the management of Building Inspection reports, it would be necessary to establish telemetric gateways between the different entities, such as city councils, regional and state administrations, in order to facilitate an agile, coordinated and efficient management of the reports on the actions of public administrations.

It seems reasonable and convenient that the Building Inspection reports are made with the required quality and with the appropriate guarantees for both the Public Administration and the professional who writes the report.

Consequently, independent control systems should be established through organizations that ensure the formal correction of the report and compliance with the ordinances, as well as the competence of the technical editor.

Legislative and instrumental

It is essential to propose models of regulatory ordinances of the Building Inspection for municipalities, and establish regulatory regulations from the regional level for application by municipalities and the constitution of the Integrated Single Registry, which would help in the preparation of specific ordinances, in accordance with the interests and needs of each one.

Among other aspects, these ordinance models should contain effective ways to guarantee the obligatory nature of conducting a Building Inspection. At this point, it is interesting to compare the Building Inspection report with the Technical Inspection of Vehicles to analyze what is the reason why it is implemented and assumed by the company.

Obviously the sanctioning regime that accompanies it seems to be responsible to a greater extent that this happens, but not always the sanctions guarantee compliance with the laws. In fact, all the existing Building & Pest Inspection ordinances, which include in their articles a sanctioning regime, have not always had the desired effects. But in any case, information to the citizen is considered one of the most effective. Perhaps regulation at the state level and not at the local level, has also facilitated it.

In fact for municipalities it is difficult and uncomfortable to demand more payments to the owners, given their proximity, especially in the smaller municipalities, and even more so considering the problems arising from the current economic crisis. There are no excuses justifying not demanding it from a community, on the grounds that it cannot pay for a possible and expensive structural repair of its building.

In any case, a bad favor is given to an owner not demanding his duty to make a Building & Pest Inspection report, because in short, it is an inspection that detects possible injuries, informs and warns the owners about the lack of security of the property, so that, at least, they take the appropriate preventive measures.

In short, it is about reducing the risk of the people who inhabit it, regardless of the information that can be provided about improvements in energy savings and accessibility.

The use of legal instruments, as in this case a Building & Pest Inspection, as an information channel for users of buildings, on other aspects that are not their own, is presented as a great strategy. In fact, the Building Inspection informs users about the energy efficiency of their homes, by linking the energy certificate to the Building Inspection.

Another interesting example of synergies between legal instruments is that contained in Law 8/2013, when it requires the preparation of a Building Inspection as a preliminary report to the granting of aid for rehabilitation, to ensure the coherence of the actions that are intended to subsidize.

This idea is reinforced by the fact that, as shown by the analysis of the results of the Building & Pest Inspection, it is observed that, for the most part, the inspections are motivated by the request for aid for rehabilitation.

Continuing with this idea, we also find ourselves obliged to demand the energy efficiency certificate at the time of the sale or rental of a property. Similarly, it would be interesting to require a Building Inspection conditioned on the granting of licenses for second occupation and the purchase-sale or rental of housing in buildings over 50 years old.

It could also be raised the requirement, to a community of owners, to submit a Building Inspection when you intend to hire a damage insurance with a company, in the case that your property is more than 50 years old. Analyzing Law 50/1980 of insurance contracts, it is indicated that the policyholder has the duty, before the conclusion of the contract, to declare to the insurer, all the circumstances known to him that may influence the risk assessment.

Although there is no clear reference in relation to the obligation to make an Building Inspection report, it could be interpreted that owners should communicate to the insurance company in case of having an unfavorable Building Inspection or, if applicable, having done so when the building He is over 50 years old.

Otherwise, an insurance company could interpret that an owner has breached his obligations and could refuse to pay the costs of a repair. In any case, the maintenance contract of a property is not a contract of insurance of damages of the same one. They follow parallel lines, and are only related by the fact that the greater and better the benefits of the former, the lower the premiums of the latter will be cheaper.

Starting from the knowledge generated about the existing building, the Building Inspection report must be articulated as the first document to constitute the Book of the existing building.

In addition, the constitution of the Book of the building from the Building Inspection would allow the planning of the maintenance actions that would be reflected in the corresponding maintenance and rehabilitation plan of the building, where the operations and interventions necessary to maintain the useful life of the building would be scheduled. Adequate conditions. The inspection of thermal installations should also be included in this maintenance program,

An Action Plan or adaptation to minimum housing conditions should also be prepared, in the form of a road map for its progressive adaptation to the regulations, with the ultimate goal of increasing the quality, security, habitability and functionality of the homes.

This Action Plan should incorporate an economic feasibility study in a planned manner that would allow the creation of a reserve fund according to budgets and deadlines with reasonable returns.

Economic and financial

The most important economic investment that a citizen makes during his life is the purchase of his house. Maintaining the value of your asset becomes a fundamental objective. An interesting strategy is to demonstrate to the owners of buildings the capital gains and revaluation generated by their maintenance and rehabilitation, in addition to increasing the useful life of the building.

The Building Inspection report does not stop being an inspection operation within a maintenance program and has to be considered from the economic need of the asset. The building in good condition, if sold, directly provides a much higher value than when maintenance is ignored.

In contrast, today, the owners consider the maintenance as an unnecessary expense, and punctual repair is preferred when damage is detected, even if this implies a high and punctual economic outlay. As indicated above, there is no culture of maintenance among citizens. The current culture of quality and safety should no longer be based on mere corrective inspections, but should be based on the principles of prevention and prediction.

In short, a maintenance plan does not stop being a financial plan with an important profitability. As indicated above, there is no culture of maintenance among citizens. The current culture of quality and safety should no longer be based on mere corrective inspections, but should be based on the principles of prevention and prediction.

In short, a maintenance plan does not stop being a financial plan with an important profitability. As indicated above, there is no culture of maintenance among citizens. The current culture of quality and safety should no longer be based on mere corrective inspections, but should be based on the principles of prevention and prediction. In short, a maintenance plan does not stop being a financial plan with an important profitability.

The communities of owners should be obliged to set up a reserve fund to undertake these inspections and the actions derived from them. Something similar is practiced with the economic spills that owners must make at certain times, but regulated in a more official way.

It would be interesting that the aid for the realization of the Building Inspection cover the total amount of realization of the same, because the cost is not high and its gratuity for citizens would constitute an indirect spur to rehabilitation. In this sense, the experience in the Community during the 90s, is interesting.

In those years, inspections aimed at detecting problems derived from the use of aluminous cement in concrete floors were subsidized 100%. Also from November 2007 to June 2011, in the Community, the Building & Pest Inspection reports were 100% subsidized to the communities of owners who requested aid for rehabilitation.

This little gesture, it caused that many communities of neighbors requested them and this derived in important acts of rehabilitation. The economic cost of a technical inspection is negligible compared to the cost of the intervention it can generate.

Given that the new work will be difficult to return to have an important role in the economy, the rehabilitation of buildings will become the main source of income for municipalities.

Consequently, it is essential that they raise support programs and mobilization plans for the sector, where the completion of the Building & Pest Inspection is the starting point for the entire process. The generation of a Building Inspection fund that channels resources and facilitates their use.

Finally, it should be noted that preparing a program of tax advantages in the case of conducting a Building Inspection can constitute aid.

Systematic implementation of the building inspection report
Based on the analysis of the rules on Building Inspection & Pest Inspection and the experience gained with the preparation of reports, a reflection is made on the main bar
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